August 7, 2020 

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

Latest Trends and Research on
SUD Treatment and Prevention

Dear IBADCC Members,

We can't believe it is already August! Wow, 2020 has brought changes and challenges, but through it all we have persevered to provide our clients with the best possible care. Part of our duty is to stay up-to-date on the latest trends and research coming out on SUD treatment and prevention. To help keep you in the loop, we are focusing this week's newsletter on studies and articles that have been released this year. Before we look at the science, we will start by congratulating our new and renewing certificate holders, then conclude this edition with an awesome announcement about ICAAD going virtual! Also in this issue we celebrate our renewing certificate holders and highlight upcoming continuing education opportunities.


Congratulations Renewing IBADCC Certificate Holders
The IBADCC is proud to share the names of the following individuals who have renewed their certifications!
The IBADCC recognizes the hard work and dedication it takes to keep these certifications current. Thank you for your continued pursuit of excellence. It is certainly a benefit to our clients throughout Idaho! 
 
New Research Study Results Released Over the Last Three Months
The following studies were announced by the National Institute on Drug Abuse since April of this year: For a complete list of studies released in 2020, visit the NIDA website.


ICADD Has Gone Virtual! 
We know that many of you were disappointed to hear the in-person ICAAD conference was canceled because you rely on this event for your continuing education hours. We are excited to announce that ICAAD has now gone virtual! Sessions will be available during the month of September, and On-Demand sessions will be open until October 18th, 2020. You now have the opportunity to gain up to 27 CE credits! You can learn more about the programming by viewing the event schedule here.

Register Now

 

Questions?
If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC's Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, our Facebook page, and our new LinkedIn page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.

Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members
Stay Connected
Follow IBADCC on Facebook and LinkedIn for all of our latest updates!
Facebook
LinkedIn
Website
Email
IBADCC Education
IBADCC | 2095 Daniels St. #963, Long Lake, MN 55356

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July 31, 2020 

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New Online
Application and Renewal Platform
& Educational Opportunities

Dear IBADCC Members,

This week, we are excited to provide important IBADCC updates, including the announcement of our move to a new online platform for certification applications and renewals, new online education available, and sponsorship opportunities. 


New Online Application & Renewal Platform
The IBADCC has been hard at work moving to a new online platform, streamlining the application and renewal process for our certification holders. The new system allows professionals to upload and manage certification files and documents online at any time from a computer or phone, pay fees online, access copies of certificates when needed, and receive email alerts and reminders when applications are approved or up for renewal. 

Current certification holders received an email earlier this week with login instructions to complete their profile. New applications can now complete their application online, uploading required documentation directly to their profile. 
Login & Complete Your Profile
Having trouble logging in to the platform? Contact us at ibadcc@ibadcc.org.

**New IBADCC applicants should begin by selecting their certification application at ibadcc.org
Online Education 
IBADCC OnDemand Webinar: Navigating TeleHealth Technology with SUD Groups 
This one-hour recorded webinar will help professionals see the benefits to both counselor and clients by providing services via TeleHealth-based groups by expanding your understanding, comfort zone, and interest in offering TeleHealth-based SUD groups.

CEU Hours: 1.0 CEU hours approved by IBADCC
Registration Fee: $10 for members/$20 for non-members
Earn CE Today
IBADCC Sponsorship Opportunities
Interested in connecting with our community of over 450 professionals? The IBADCC now has a variety of marketing opportunities available, including advertisements, webinars, and surveys. Partner with IBADCC to demonstrate your commitment to the substance use disorder treatment field and help support our growing professional community through a variety of sponsorship opportunities. 
Learn More

 

Questions?
If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC’s Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, our Facebook page, and our new LinkedIn page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.

Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members
Stay Connected
Follow IBADCC on Facebook and LinkedIn for all of our latest updates!
Facebook
LinkedIn
Website
Email

July 24, 2020 

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

Self-Care Assessment &
Resources for Your Tool-Kit

Dear IBADCC Members,

How are you doing this week? As we continue to live through the COVID-19 pandemic, we realize that we are in it for the long haul! Numbers continue to rise, regulations are changing daily, and we are stretched to the limit managing our own self-care and the mental health of our clients. You may find the self-care assessment checklist in this week’s newsletter an eye opening activity! After focusing on you, we’ll turn our attention to continuing our observation of July as BIPOC Mental Health Month, highlighting Black and African American communities and mental health, including an awesome list of fact sheets and resources you can add to your tool box. Before we dive in, let’s celebrate our new and renewing certificate holders!

Congratulations Renewing IBADCC Certificate Holders
The IBADCC is proud to share the names of the following individuals who have passed their certification exams, earning their credential, and those who have renewed their certifications!
The IBADCC recognizes the hard work and dedication it takes to work towards and keep these certifications current. Thank you for your continued pursuit of excellence. It is certainly a benefit to our clients throughout Idaho! 
 
Self-Care Assessment
What have you done lately to preserve or improve your own health? Self-care is the practice of taking an active role in protecting your own well-being and happiness, particularly during periods of stress. But what does self-care encompass and how can we become more aware of the variety of ways we can focus our energy on maintaining our health and happiness? Taking care of yourself means being in tune and responsive to your physical, psychological, emotional, social, spiritual, and professional needs. We found this great tool published by Therapist Aid that allows you to download a worksheet to help evaluate how frequently, or how well, you are performing different self care activities. The goal of this assessment is to help you learn about your self-care needs by spotting patterns and recognizing areas of your life that need more attention. Take care of yourselves, counselors!
Download Assessment


Black and African American Communities and Mental Health
Did you know that 13.4% of the U.S. population identifies as black or African American? Of those, 16% reported having a mental illness in the past year- that is over 7 million people, MORE people than the populations of Chicago, Houston, and Philadelphia combined. Overall, mental health conditions occur in Black and African American people in America at about the same or less frequency than in White Americans. However, the historical Black and African American experience in America has and continues to be characterized by trauma and violence more often than for their White counterparts and impacts emotional and mental health of both youth and adults. Mental Health America recognizes that “historical dehumanization, oppression, and violence against Black and African American people has evolved into present day racism - structural, institutional, and individual – and cultivates a uniquely mistrustful and less affluent community experience, characterized by a myriad of disparities including inadequate access to and delivery of care in the health system. Processing and dealing with layers of individual trauma on top of new mass traumas from COVID-19 (uncertainty, isolation, grief from financial or human losses), police brutality and its fetishization in news media, and divisive political rhetoric adds compounding layers of complexity for individuals to responsibly manage.”
 
According to SAMHSA’s 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health:

  • Sixteen percent (4.8 million) of Black and African American people reported having a mental illness, and 22.4 percent of those (1.1 million people) reported a serious mental illness over the past year.
  • Serious mental illness (SMI) rose among all ages of Black and African American people between 2008 and 2018.
  • Despite rates being less than the overall U.S. population, major depressive episodes increased from 9 percent-10.3 percent in Black and African American youth ages 12-17, 6.1 percent to 9.4 percent in young adults 18-25, and 5.7 percent to 6.3 percent in the 26-49 age range between 2015 and 2018.
  • Suicidal thoughts, plans, and attempts are also rising among Black and African American young adults. While still lower than the overall U.S. population aged 18-25, 9.5 percent (439,000) of Black and African American 18-25-year-olds had serious thoughts of suicide in 2018, compared to 6 percent (277,000) in 2008. 3.6 percent (166,000) made a plan in 2018, compared to 2.1 percent (96,000) in 2008, and 2.4 percent (111,000) made an attempt in 2018, compared to 1.5 percent (70,000) in 2008.
  • Binge drinking, smoking (cigarettes and marijuana), illicit drug use and prescription pain reliever misuse are more frequent among Black and African American adults with mental illnesses.
     

Treatment Barriers and Considerations for Black and African American Clients
When we consider treatment barriers, it’s important to look at attitudes towards mental health and treatment in the Black and African American communities. According to a study conducted by Ward, Wiltshire, Detry, and Brown in 2013:

  • Black and African American hold beliefs related to stigma, psychological openness, and help-seeking, which in turn affects their coping behaviors. The participants in this study were not very open to acknowledging psychological problems, but they were somewhat open to seek mental health services.
  • Thirty percent of participants reported having a mental illness or receiving treatment for a mental illness
  • Black and African American men are particularly concerned about stigma.
  • Cohort effects, exposure to mental illness, and increased knowledge of mental illness are factors that could potentially change beliefs about symptoms of mental illness.
  • Participants appeared apprehensive about seeking professional help for mental health issues, which is consistent with previous research. However, participants were willing to seek out some form of help.

A significant barrier to treatment is a worry that mental health care practitioners are not culturally competent enough to treat issues specific to Black and African American individuals. Unfortunately, Black and African American providers, who are known to give more appropriate and effective care to Black and African American help-seekers, make up a very small portion of the behavioral health provider workforce, including less than 2% of American Psychological Association members. Stigma and judgment also prevent Black and African American people from seeking treatment for their mental illnesses. Research indicates that Blacks and African Americans believe that mild depression or anxiety would be considered “crazy” in their social circles. Furthermore, many believe that discussions about mental illness would not be appropriate even among family. Given this, it’s important behavioral health providers are equipped with resources needed to effectively work with Black and African American clients.
 

Mental Health Resources for Black and African American Clients
Mental Health America created a fantastic toolkit for BIPOC Mental Health Month, including links to the following resources we are excited to share with you!



Looking for resources for your Native and Indigenous Clients? View last week's newsletter for more information on cultural factors, treatment barriers and considerations, and mental health resources that impact these clients.
 

It's Not Too Late - Register Now!
Live IBADCC Webinar: Navigating TeleHealth Technology with SUD Groups (July 24th at 10am MST)
This one-hour live webinar will help counselors see the benefits to both counselor and clients by providing services via TeleHealth-based groups by expanding your understanding, comfort zone, and interest in offering TeleHealth-based SUD groups.

CEU Hours: 1.0 CEU hours approved by IBADCC
Registration Fee: $10 for members/$20 for non-members
Register Now

 

Questions?
If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC’s Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, our Facebook page, and our new LinkedIn page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.

Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members
Stay Connected
Follow IBADCC on Facebook and LinkedIn for all of our latest updates!
Facebook
LinkedIn
Website
Email
IBADCC | 2095 Daniels St. #963, Long Lake, MN 55356

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July 17, 2020 

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Resources for Your Native and Indigenous Clients and Communities
& Upcoming CE Opportunities

Dear IBADCC Members,

Formally known as National Minority Health Month, this July we observe the newly renamed BIPOC Mental Health Month. Since 2008, this observance has been used to bring awareness to the unique struggles that underrepresented groups face regarding mental illness in the United States. In this week’s newsletter, we turn our focus to Native and Indigenous communities and mental health. Approximately 1.3% of the U.S population (4.2 million Americans) identify as Native American or Alaskan Native. Of those, 19% reported having a mental illness in the past year. That is over 827,000 people- enough to fill every major league baseball stadium on the east coast TWICE! Read on to learn more about the cultural factors, treatment issues, and mental health resources for Native and Indigenous communities. Also in this issue we celebrate our renewing certificate holders and highlight upcoming continuing education opportunities.

Congratulations Renewing IBADCC Certificate Holders
The IBADCC is proud to share the names of the following individuals who have renewed their certifications!
The IBADCC recognizes the hard work and dedication it takes to keep these certifications current. Thank you for your continued pursuit of excellence. It is certainly a benefit to our clients throughout Idaho! 
Cultural Factors Impacting Our Native and Indigenous Clients
Compared to other groups, Native Americans experience some of the highest rates of substance abuse, mental health disorders, violence, and suicide. Given this, it is imperative that we as counselors understand the impact of culture on mental health prevalence and treatment issues in our Native and Indigenous clients. Many Native/Indigenous tribes embrace a worldview that encompasses the notions of connectedness (with the past and with others), strong family bonds, adaptability, oneness with nature, wisdom of elders, meaningful traditions and strong spirit that may serve as protective factors when it comes to mental health. The concept of mental illness and beliefs about why and how it develops have many different meanings and interpretations among Native/Indigenous people. Physical complaints and psychological concerns are not distinguished, and Native/Indigenous people may express emotional distress in ways that are not consistent with standard diagnostic categories. Native/Indigenous people who meet the criteria for depression, anxiety, or substance abuse disorders are much more likely to seek help from a spiritual and/or traditional healer than from specialty or other medical sources.

Alcohol and Drug Use Among Native and Indigenous People
Native/Indigenous people face an increased risk of substance use and addiction given their history in the United States. Forced relocations, broken treaties, and other political injustices have disproportionately affected this population. High rates of historical trauma, violence, racism, loss, legalized segregation, isolation, and discrimination in native communities place these people at an increased risk for alcohol and drug use disorders.

According to the Native American Center for Excellence, “Among Native Americans, the rate of alcohol use is actually lower than among other races, however, the rate of binge drinking is higher, as is the number of people with alcohol use disorders. They are also more likely to report a past-year substance use or alcohol disorder than any other race. Chronic liver disease, including cirrhosis, is the 6th leading cause of death for Native and Indigenous people. Drug use by Native and Indigenous people is higher than any other single ethnic group, including the highest rate of methamphetamine use of any demographic.”
 

Treatment Barriers and Considerations for Native and Indigenous Clients
Many Native/Indigenous communities have limited access to substance use disorder services. Nearly 20% of native adults need treatment for drug or alcohol use disorders, but only 12% actually receive treatment. So what are some of the barriers?

  • High levels of poverty and economic constraints
  • Lack of health insurance or poor insurance coverage
  • Cultural stigma associated with substance use disorders
  • Shortage of appropriate treatment options in regions where native populations are concentrated

“Every tribe is unique, with varying locations, populations, histories, substance use patterns, and degrees of trust placed in westernized medicine. In order to be effective, treatment approaches need to be tailored to address the barriers and needs of each individual tribe and patient,” writes the American Addiction Centers. They have outlined strategies that blend traditional native teachings with evidence-based practices and cognitive therapies. Read more about these approaches in this article.
 

Mental Health Resources for Native and Indigenous Clients
Mental Health America created a fantastic toolkit for BIPOC Mental Health Month, including links to the following resources we are excited to share with you!

  • One Sky Center. The American Indian/Alaska Native National Resource Center for Health, Education, and Research; mission is to improve prevention and treatment of mental health and substance use problems and services among Native people.
  • WeRNative.  A comprehensive health resource for Native youth by Native youth, promoting holistic health and positive growth in local communities and nation at large.
  • Indian Health Services, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The HIS has great resources that connect the community to IHS programs designed specifically to address alcohol and substance abuse, domestic violence, mental health care, suicide prevention, and other issues that affect the Native American community.
  • Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research. The CAIANH strives to improve health outcomes for Native peoples through research, education, and information dissemination.
  • National Indian Health Board. The National Indian Health Board is working to increase awareness of the Behavioral Health needs in Indian Country and aims to identify challenges and highlight successful strategies so that communities have the information they need to promote and protect the health of all American Indian and Alaska Native people.

The SAMHSA Tribal Training and Technical Assistance Center hosts a variety of free webinars on the well being of tribal youth and families. All recordings are free and can be found on their website.

Register Now!
Live IBADCC Webinar: Navigating TeleHealth Technology with SUD Groups (July 24th at 10am MST)
This one-hour live webinar will help counselors see the benefits to both counselor and clients by providing services via TeleHealth-based groups by expanding your understanding, comfort zone, and interest in offering TeleHealth-based SUD groups.

CEU Hours: 1.0 CEU hours approved by IBADCC
Registration Fee: $10 for members/$20 for non-members
Register Now

 

Questions?
If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC’s Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, our Facebook page, and our new LinkedIn page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.

Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members
Stay Connected
Follow IBADCC on Facebook and LinkedIn for all of our latest updates!
Facebook
LinkedIn
Website
Email
IBADCC | 2095 Daniels St. #963, Long Lake, MN 55356

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July 9, 2020

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Educational Resources & Upcoming Events

Dear IBADCC Members,

This week we are excited to bring you an issue full of all things education-related! Over the last few years, our members have expressed a need for additional continuing education opportunities to help keep their knowledge fresh and certification up to date. The IBADCC has heard you, and we have been taking steps to create a hub for these training resources. While we are still in the early stages, we are excited to announce the creation of a new education arm! Read on to learn more about the new IBADCC Center for Addiction and Recovery Resources, including registration information for our first live webinar offering. Also in this issue is information about our updated CE provider process and a note on changes to the ICAAD conference this year.

Congratulations New and Renewing IBADCC Certificate Holders
The IBADCC is proud to share the names of the following individuals who have passed their certification exams, earning their credential, and those who have renewed their certifications!
The IBADCC recognizes the hard work and dedication it takes to work towards and keep these certifications current. Thank you for your continued pursuit of excellence. It is certainly a benefit to our clients throughout Idaho! 
*NEW* IBADCC Center for Addiction and Recovery Resources
The IBADCC Center for Addiction and Recovery Resources is a new program aimed to provide continuing education opportunities for SUD counselors, prevention specialists, coaches, and supervisors. The training opportunities will include both live-virtual and online learning options, with a goal of helping members gain the CE hours needed for their certification and recertifications in the required domains. Our aim is to ensure timely, relevant, and engaging content is made available to members at an affordable price. We welcome your suggestions for training topics and are always on the lookout for passionate presenters willing to share their expertise! Please provide your suggestions for topics and speakers by filling out our brief 3 question survey.
Complete Brief Survey

Register Now!
Live IBADCC Webinar: Navigating TeleHealth Technology with SUD Groups (July 24th)
Join the first event sponsored by the IBADCC Center for Addiction and Recovery Resources! On Friday, July 24th from 10-11am, IBADCC President, Jim Meldrum, will be presenting on the benefits, challenges, and skills needed to successfully integrate telehealth into your SUD groups. This event is intended for those new to telehealth who have an interest in incorporating this new method, those who have started implementing telehealth but are seeking direction and new skills, and those who are still waiting for things to go back to “normal” with groups. This presentation is also great for supervisors who have facilitators expanding services into telehealth. With your help, we can increase these services for our clients in Idaho. Learn more and register below!

Event Description: Many counselors have been thrust into a new world of meeting virtually with clients and groups. While this option opens up new and exciting possibilities, some facilitators have been hesitant to explore this new mode of facilitation. Others have started but are facing struggles in the management of groups via telehealth. This one-hour live webinar will help counselors see the benefits to both counselor and clients by providing services via telehealth-based groups by expanding your understanding, comfort zone, and interest in offering telehealth-based SUD groups. This presentation will help you:

  • Identify the benefits of telehealth groups for participants and facilitators
  • Define “disinhibition” and understand what you need to be aware of and how to use it to your advantage
  • Understand the basics of setting yourself up for telehealth success
  • Incorporate basic telehealth group rules
  • Identify the appropriate measures to have in place to ensure a secure, confidential, and protected space for clients
  • Understand the ways Zoom can be used for telehealth
  • Discuss next steps and points of consideration including informed consent, safety plans, equipment needed, and more!

CEU Hours: 1.0 CEU hours approved by IBADCC
Registration Fee: $10 for members/$20 for non-members

Register Now

New CE Provider Process
If you are a provider of continuing education programs and you would like to apply for IBADCC endorsement of your training course, please take a moment to review our new CE Provider Application form located on our website. Continuing education courses must specifically relate to the knowledge and skills necessary to perform the tasks within each International Certification Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC) performance domain. Applications should be submitted no later than 30 days prior to the continuing education event. We’ve recently revised our process to include marketing perks for IBADCC members. Included with your application fee is a listing on the IBADCC website as an approved provider, registration link to the program on the IBADCC website, one listing in the educational offerings section of the IBADCC newsletter, one social media post, and 50% off additional marketing add-ons. We are excited to grow our base of approved CE providers, so please pass on this information to talented trainers in Idaho and beyond.
 

ICADD Goes Virtual
Many counselors in Idaho were disappointed to learn that ICADD 2020 had been canceled this year. While the decision was a necessary measure against COVID-19 transmission, it left many counselors wondering where they could obtain needed continuing education credits. We were excited to see that ICADD recently announced the decision to transition the conference to a fully virtual event! The conference will be held over the month of September, which is nationally recognized as Recovery Month. Registration will begin later this month, with more details coming soon. Keep an eye on their website for information on how you can attend and earn up to 27 CE hours!


Questions?
If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC’s Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, our Facebook page, and our new LinkedIn page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.

Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members
Stay Connected
Follow IBADCC on Facebook and LinkedIn for all of our latest updates!
Facebook
LinkedIn
Website
Email
IBADCC | 2095 Daniels St. #963, Long Lake, MN 55356

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.






This email was sent to *|EMAIL|*
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
*|LIST:ADDRESSLINE|*

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June 25, 2020

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

Educational Resources & Upcoming Events

Dear IBADCC Members,

This week we are excited to bring you an issue full of all things education-related! Over the last few years, our members have expressed a need for additional continuing education opportunities to help keep their knowledge fresh and certification up to date. The IBADCC has heard you, and we have been taking steps to create a hub for these training resources. While we are still in the early stages, we are excited to announce the creation of a new education arm! Read on to learn more about the new IBADCC Center for Addiction and Recovery Resources, including registration information for our first live webinar offering. Also in this issue is information about our updated CE provider process and a note on changes to the ICAAD conference this year.

Congratulations New and Renewing IBADCC Certificate Holders
The IBADCC is proud to share the names of the following individuals who have passed their certification exams, earning their credential, and those who have renewed their certifications!
The IBADCC recognizes the hard work and dedication it takes to work towards and keep these certifications current. Thank you for your continued pursuit of excellence. It is certainly a benefit to our clients throughout Idaho! 
*NEW* IBADCC Center for Addiction and Recovery Resources
The IBADCC Center for Addiction and Recovery Resources is a new program aimed to provide continuing education opportunities for SUD counselors, prevention specialists, coaches, and supervisors. The training opportunities will include both live-virtual and online learning options, with a goal of helping members gain the CE hours needed for their certification and recertifications in the required domains. Our aim is to ensure timely, relevant, and engaging content is made available to members at an affordable price. We welcome your suggestions for training topics and are always on the lookout for passionate presenters willing to share their expertise! Please provide your suggestions for topics and speakers by filling out our brief 3 question survey.
Complete Brief Survey

Register Now!
Live IBADCC Webinar: Navigating TeleHealth Technology with SUD Groups (July 24th)
Join the first event sponsored by the IBADCC Center for Addiction and Recovery Resources! On Friday, July 24th from 10-11am, IBADCC President, Jim Meldrum, will be presenting on the benefits, challenges, and skills needed to successfully integrate telehealth into your SUD groups. This event is intended for those new to telehealth who have an interest in incorporating this new method, those who have started implementing telehealth but are seeking direction and new skills, and those who are still waiting for things to go back to “normal” with groups. This presentation is also great for supervisors who have facilitators expanding services into telehealth. With your help, we can increase these services for our clients in Idaho. Learn more and register below!

Event Description: Many counselors have been thrust into a new world of meeting virtually with clients and groups. While this option opens up new and exciting possibilities, some facilitators have been hesitant to explore this new mode of facilitation. Others have started but are facing struggles in the management of groups via telehealth. This one-hour live webinar will help counselors see the benefits to both counselor and clients by providing services via telehealth-based groups by expanding your understanding, comfort zone, and interest in offering telehealth-based SUD groups. This presentation will help you:

  • Identify the benefits of telehealth groups for participants and facilitators
  • Define “disinhibition” and understand what you need to be aware of and how to use it to your advantage
  • Understand the basics of setting yourself up for telehealth success
  • Incorporate basic telehealth group rules
  • Identify the appropriate measures to have in place to ensure a secure, confidential, and protected space for clients
  • Understand the ways Zoom can be used for telehealth
  • Discuss next steps and points of consideration including informed consent, safety plans, equipment needed, and more!

CEU Hours: 1.0 CEU hours approved by IBADCC
Registration Fee: $10 for members/$20 for non-members

Register Now

New CE Provider Process
If you are a provider of continuing education programs and you would like to apply for IBADCC endorsement of your training course, please take a moment to review our new CE Provider Application form located on our website. Continuing education courses must specifically relate to the knowledge and skills necessary to perform the tasks within each International Certification Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC) performance domain. Applications should be submitted no later than 30 days prior to the continuing education event. We’ve recently revised our process to include marketing perks for IBADCC members. Included with your application fee is a listing on the IBADCC website as an approved provider, registration link to the program on the IBADCC website, one listing in the educational offerings section of the IBADCC newsletter, one social media post, and 50% off additional marketing add-ons. We are excited to grow our base of approved CE providers, so please pass on this information to talented trainers in Idaho and beyond.
 

ICADD Goes Virtual
Many counselors in Idaho were disappointed to learn that ICADD 2020 had been canceled this year. While the decision was a necessary measure against COVID-19 transmission, it left many counselors wondering where they could obtain needed continuing education credits. We were excited to see that ICADD recently announced the decision to transition the conference to a fully virtual event! The conference will be held over the month of September, which is nationally recognized as Recovery Month. Registration will begin later this month, with more details coming soon. Keep an eye on their website for information on how you can attend and earn up to 27 CE hours!


Questions?
If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC’s Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, our Facebook page, and our new LinkedIn page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.

Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members
Stay Connected
Follow IBADCC on Facebook and LinkedIn for all of our latest updates!
Facebook
LinkedIn
Website
Email
IBADCC | 2095 Daniels St. #963, Long Lake, MN 55356

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You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.






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June 25, 2020

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Mental Health Toolkit:
Crisis Counseling Resources

Dear IBADCC Members,

We recognize that the last few months have been extremely stressful and uncertain for both counselors and clients. Many individuals have faced isolation, job loss, and financial strain due to COVID-19. Some have experienced trauma and grief due to recent national events. It seems as though each month we are faced with unforeseen challenges that impact our collective mental, emotional, and physical health. During this time, we encourage you to be acutely aware of the mental health and well-being of yourself, loved ones, clients, and colleagues. Specifically, we’d like to spend this newsletter issue discussing the risk factors and warning signs of suicide, with a focus on crisis counseling resources that you can add to your mental health toolkit.

Risk Factors and Warning Signs of Suicide
Research has found that 46% of people who die by suicide had a known mental heath condition. Some mental disorders are higher risk including mood disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, and certain personality disorders. This data is extremely important for us as counselors to be aware of, because rates of mental health conditions are much higher for those with substance use disorders. Roughly 37% of those with alcohol use disorders, and 53% of those with other drug use disorders, also have at least one serious mental illness. Given that alcohol and other substance use disorders are also a risk factor for suicide, it’s imperative that counselors understand the full range of suicide risk factors, behaviors, and warning signs. It’s also important for us in the counseling profession to recognize that our work is oftentimes very stressful, and prolonged stress, especially when coupled with other risk factors like a recent job loss or tragedy, can lead to suicidal thoughts or behaviors. In the interest of you and your client’s health and safety, read on to learn how to recognize the signs.

Risk Factors Include:

It is also important to be aware that suicidal behaviors are a psychiatric emergency. If you, a client, or loved one starts to take any of these steps, seek immediate help from a health care provider or call 911:

  • Talking about wanting to die or kill oneself
  • Collecting and saving pills or buying a weapon
  • Giving away possessions
  • Tying up loose ends, like organizing personal papers or paying off debts
  • Saying goodbye to friends and family


Crisis Counseling Resources
When faced with a suicide-related crisis, professionals are often caught off-guard and unprepared for how to handle the emergent situation. Unlike other client work we may be engaged with, it’s imperative to address suicide as a mental health crisis and act quickly and efficiently. The National Institute of Mental Health provides a frame work that we think is an easy reference for making sure we take steps to help those in emotional pain.

  1. ASK. “Are you thinking about killing yourself?” It’s not an easy question but studies show that asking at-risk individuals if they are suicidal does not increase suicides or suicidal thoughts. Call 911, if danger or self-harm seems imminent.
  2. KEEP THEM SAFE. Reducing a suicidal person’s access to highly lethal items or places is an important part of suicide prevention. While this is not always easy, asking if the at-risk person has a plan and removing or disabling the lethal means can make a difference.
  3. BE THERE. Listen carefully and learn what the individual is thinking and feeling. Research suggests acknowledging and talking about suicide may in fact reduce rather than increase suicidal thoughts.
  4. HELP THEM CONNECT. Save the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s number in your phone so it’s there when you need it: 1-800-273-TALK (8255). You can also help make a connection with a trusted individual like a family member, friend, spiritual advisor, or mental health professional.
  5. STAY CONNECTED. Staying in touch after a crisis or after being discharged from care can make a difference. Studies have shown the number of suicide deaths goes down when someone follows up with the at-risk person.
We’ve included resources below to add to your mental health toolkit:  

Questions?
If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC’s Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, our Facebook page, and our new LinkedIn page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.


Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members
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June 19, 2020

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New Online Certification Platform and
Continuing Education Opportunities

Dear IBADCC Members,

This year on December 1st, the Idaho Board of Alcohol and Drug Counselor Certification will celebrate its 25th anniversary! We are proud to be reaching this milestone and for what it represents: a quarter century of IBADCC counselors contributing to the SUD field, and more importantly, dedicating their time, energy, and effort to support our clients in Idaho. Our mission has been to provide a mechanism for counselor certification, and we are proud to know that to-date, 916 counselors have achieved IBADCC certification status. Through this certification, we ensure that addiction professionals are maintaining continuing education requirements and adhering to ethical standards of care for their clients. Until now, this certification process has been done through a paper application process. We are excited to announce that we have been working through a transition to move our certification program to an online platform! In this week's newsletter you can learn more about our new certification software and also scroll down to explore upcoming live webinar continuing education opportunities. But first, we wish to congratulate our new certification holders!

Congratulations New IBADCC Certificate Holders
The IBADCC is proud to share the names of the following individuals who have passed their certification exams! 

The IBADCC recognizes the hard work and dedication it takes to work towards these certifications. Thank you for your continued pursuit of excellence. It is certainly a benefit to our clients throughout Idaho! 

New Online Certification Platform
We are pleased to announce that IBADCC will be migrating to a new software system that will let you manage applications and renewals online!
The new system will allow you to:

  • Start your application or renewal from our website
  • Complete your application or renewal online, using any phone or computer, at any time
  • Upload and manage your certification files and documents online in a "Digital Wallet"
  • Pay your renewal fee online
  • Receive email reminders that keep you on time and on task so you never forget something
  • Receive email alerts when we have reviewed and approved your submissions
  • Receive a digital copy of your certificate upon completion

We currently expect the new system to go live on July 6th, 2020, so stay tuned for additional communication with next steps and important notes!

If you are in the middle of submitting your renewal or application, please feel free to email your application and documents directly to ibadcc@ibadcc.org.

Upcoming Live Webinar Continuing Education Opportunities
We know that it can be difficult to obtain all of your required continuing education credits, especially during COVID-19 restrictions! Check out the numerous upcoming live webinar opportunities hosted by some of our approved CE providers:

 

Questions?
If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC's Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, our Facebook page, and our new LinkedIn page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.


Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members

June 11, 2020

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Expanding Your Toolkit with Articles & Educational Opportunities to Help Address Racial-Based Trauma and Dismantle Oppressive Systems

Dear IBADCC Members,

Across the country, we are collectively experiencing grief, trauma, loss, and an uprising of individuals and communities calling us all to action. The recent national events have magnified the persistence of systemic oppression and racism that permeates our society, whether through conscious or unconscious bias. Many of us have been thinking, what is my role in helping to dismantle oppressive systems? How do I help my black, indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) clients manage and address the trauma they experience? How do I work with clients to process the traumatic events they are watching live and online? We know these are big questions that are not easily answered. We also know that as counselors, we are essential to our clients and communities in helping to initiate and navigate these difficult conversations. In this week's newsletter we work to expand your toolkit by helping to define the counselor's role in addressing racial-based trauma, providing articles to broaden your understanding of racial issues, and highlighting educational opportunities to learn more. But first, let's take a moment to acknowledge the achievements of our latest cohort of certification applicants! 

Congratulations New and Renewing IBADCC Certificate Holders
The IBADCC is proud to share the names of the following individuals who have passed their certification exams, earning their credential, and those who have renewed their certification! 

The IBADCC recognizes the hard work and dedication it takes to work towards and keep these certifications current. Thank you for your continued pursuit of excellence. It is certainly a benefit to our clients throughout Idaho! 

The SUD Counselor's Role in Addressing Racial-Based Trauma
The American Psychological Association explains that many ethnic and racial groups experience higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as compared to White Americans. One explanation for this is the experience of racism, which can itself be traumatic. When traumatization is due to experiences of racism it is sometimes called racial trauma. Racial trauma can result from major experiences of racism such as workplace discrimination or hate crimes, or it can be the result of an accumulation of many small occurrences, such as everyday discrimination and microaggressions. Assessing discriminatory distress in BIPOC patients during a clinical encounter may be uncomfortable for therapists who have not had practice discussing racial issues.

A recent article on Counseling Minority Groups in a Time of Racial Unrest, notes: "There is no formal recognition of racial trauma in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Members of minority groups who seek counseling due to racial trauma often face the challenge of working with clinicians who do not have the education or skills to help their patients deal with the issues. Of the clinicians who work in mental health, only 10 percent were non-Caucasian. These factors often discourage some patients, prompting them to stop therapy. To improve the situation, some believe that researchers from ethnic minority groups should lead racial trauma research. Counselors also should understand how to integrate family/community cultural values into the patient's treatment process and discuss how ethnicity or race affects a person's life experiences. Counselors also should undergo training to improve multicultural competency." We know this is especially important for our SUD counselors, as rates of mental health conditions and drug/alcohol use disorders are higher among the BIPOC communities. The IBADCC could not agree more: "The role of a counselor to address and process fear in times of racial unrest is immeasurable and invaluable."  Read the full article here.

Counseling Articles to Broaden Your Understanding
In an effort to ensure IBADCC's counselors are equipped with the tools needed to provide culturally sensitive treatment, we sought to gather helpful resources to begin or continue your learning journey. We were excited to see that the American Counseling Association recently compiled a list of relevant articles to help counselors better understand racial disparities, racial injustice, and counseling competencies as it relates to racial issues. Here are a few that you may find helpful:

These articles are just the beginning! Click here to view the full list of articles and academic journal research available.

Opportunities to Learn More
It is heartening to see that so many partners in the SUD field have devoted educational tools and resources to help counselors navigate issues of race, trauma, and culturally sensitive counseling strategies. We encourage you to explore the free opportunities below!


Questions?
If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC's Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, our Facebook page, and our new LinkedIn page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.


Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members

June 5, 2020

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Exploring Risk Factors, Treatment Challenges, and Available Resources to Help in Your Work With LGBTQ+ Clients

Dear IBADCC Members,

As we begin to enjoy June for its warmer weather and longer hours of daylight, it's also the time of year that our country recognizes June as Pride Month. As counselors, we know that substance use disorders and mental health conditions are significant issues for those in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ+) community. Given the high rates of SUD among LGBTQ+ individuals, we want to make sure our IBADCC counselors are equipped with the information needed to provide competent, compassionate, sensitive, and informed treatment for this client population. This week we are devoting our newsletter to the exploration of risk factors, treatment challenges, and available resources to help in your work with LGBTQ+ clients.

Risk Factors
Why does the LGBTQ+ community face a higher risk for substance use and addiction? Numerous studies and work from counselors and advocates in the field have tried to answer this complicated question for years. While there are patterns of common risk factors among all clients, our LGBTQ+ clients face unique challenges not encountered by people who identify as heterosexual. Some of these risk factors include social stigma, social isolation, cultural pressures, internalized homophobia, discrimination, and greater risk of harassment and violence.

“The pain associated with the social stigma of being LGBTQ, of living in a culture that, for the most part, is homophobic and heterosexist, is traumatic.” -Craig Sloane, LCSW, CASAC, CSAT

The experience of rejection and isolation from peers and family can lead to “minority stress,” defined as high levels of stress felt by groups that are marginalized, which leaves people susceptible to substance use disorders. Studies have shown that LGBTQ+ individuals have been found to suffer significantly higher incidences of stressful childhood experiences, school victimization, neighborhood-level hate crimes, and family conflict. Each of these stressors have been found to correlate significantly with increased substance use. While the LGBTQ+ community has a higher incidence of substance use than heterosexuals, they also tend to seek treatment at a significantly higher rate. This is encouraging news, though we must consider that once in treatment, these clients experience specific challenges that must be addressed in order to promote successful recovery.

Treatment Challenges
A recent National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism report noted that stigma, intolerance and open discrimination were the most substantial barriers to substance abuse prevention and treatment among the LGBTQ+ community. These barriers limit access to healthy role models and LGBTQ+ supportive resources and substance-free opportunities. They also can contribute to alienation and isolation, which can increase vulnerability to substance use disorders.

LGBTQ clients who are in treatment often report feeling:
  • Lonely
  • Fearful
  • Depressed
  • Anxious
  • Angry
  • Distrustful

SUD counselors who treat LGBTQ+ clients should follow many of the same principles as addiction treatment for heterosexuals, however, clients respond best to treatment programs that are sensitive to their unique needs. 

Principles of Care
In its treatment guide, SAMHSA includes a list of nine principles of care to ensure that substance use disorder treatment providers are well equipped to cater to LGBTQ+ individuals. These include:
 
BE UNDERSTANDING AND FLEXIBLE. Addiction specialists should be understanding of the special circumstances surrounding LGBTQ+ substance abuse and tailor their treatment to meet the person's need. However, treatment should remain consistent and thorough.
 
PROVIDE A COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH. It is ideal to gather resources from different providers and specialists to tackle the different aspects of LGBTQ+ substance abuse. The variety of addiction services and a team approach may be beneficial to the individuals.
 
BE CONSISTENT WITH CULTURAL NEEDS. Addiction treatment programs should ensure that their staff is well acquainted to LGBTQ+ cultural needs and expectations. Staff members who are not familiar with LGBTQ+ issues may require sensitivity training.
 
PROMOTE SELF-RESPECT. LGBTQ+ people may have faced stigma prior to entering treatment, so it is important that specialists and staff members treat them with respect and dignity. LGBTQ+ people should always feel that they are important to their community.
 
PROMOTE HEALTH BEHAVIORS. Physicians and staff should educate LGBTQ+ patients about safe health practices and promote healthy sexual behaviors, strong relationships and compliance with medication and treatment.
 
SUPPORT COLLECTIVE DECISION MAKING. Health professionals should consult with their patients and service providers to come to a consensus on the treatment plan. It is best to include everybody involved in the recovery process to make it easier for the patient.
 
REDUCE BARRIERS TO TREATMENT. Treatment providers and recovery services should work toward eliminating any barriers to substance abuse treatment for hard-to-reach populations. They need to focus on expanding their reach and developing retention mechanisms.
 
PROVIDE EVIDENCE-BASED TREATMENT. Physicians should not assume that conventional treatment will work for LGBTQ+ people. Given the differences in issues and co-occurring disorders, treatment providers should base their treatment plan on clinically informed and research-based services.
 
CREATE A RECOVERY COMMUNITY. A recovery community provides a safe space for LGBTQ+ individuals to share their experiences about substance use disorders and recovery. Substance abuse agencies and organizations should work together to create treatment or recovery communities that cater to LGBTQ+ people and their needs.

Resources for LGBTQ+ Treatment Programs
We love the behavioral health resources put out by SAMHSA to address a variety of issues encountered when treating LGBTQ+ clients. Click on each link below to explore more.


Questions?
If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC's Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, our Facebook page, and our new LinkedIn page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.


Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members



May 29, 2020

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One Month Countdown to CADC and ISAS/SUDA Certification Changes

Dear IBADCC Members,

This week's newsletter is devoted to helping inform our certification holders and new applicants of upcoming changes to two of our certifications: the CADC and ISAS/SUDA. We know many of you have concerns about how these changes impact you, your fellow counselors, or those you supervise. Please read on for frequently asked questions and answers regarding these changes. After reading, if you find the information in this newsletter and previous editions helpful, we welcome you to send an invitation to subscribe to those who may benefit. This weekly newsletter is open to all who are serving our SUD community in Idaho. Simply copy and paste the image below and send!


Frequently Asked Questions Concerning CADC Changes
Beginning July 1st of this year, new CADC applicants will be required to have a bachelor's degree. We've received many phone calls and emails, and we're including answers to your questions below.

What if I am already working towards my CADC but won't have my application submitted by July 1, 2020?
Those pursuing their CADC prior to July 1st will need to show continuous enrollment in the process and pursuit towards the CADC certification. This can be shown by a) continued class specific studies within the CADC domains, or b) continuous work experience hours specific to the CADC domains.
 
I am currently a CADC and I do not have a bachelor's degree or higher level of education. Am I going to lose my CADC?
No, as long as your CADC remains current. If for any reason, your certification lapses, resulting in the need for reapplication for your CADC, the BS degree would then be a requirement. If you have received your BS degree or higher since your certification, please update us with this information and a copy of the degree.
 
Are there any changes to work experience hours?
No. A BS degree substitutes for 2000 hours of the 6000 hours work experience requirement. This hasn't changed. With a BS degree you will still be required to obtain 4000 work experience hours.
 
What BS degrees count for the CADC requirement?
The BS degree must be within the Behavioral Science Field. Some of these include but are not limited to: Sociology, Social Work, Psychology, Social Science, Counseling and Alcohol/Drug Studies. The board will continue to develop the acceptable degree list. If you have a BS degree which you think would qualify, please email us with your rationale and we can consider adding it to the list.
 
I have my ISAS now, but not my CADC. Will I be required to obtain a BS degree?
No. If you already have an ISAS but do not have a BS degree, you can still obtain a CADC. We recognize this is a change to your initial CADC plans and we want to support you on your CADC goal. In addition, there are some who may have begun their track towards CADC (evidenced by the classes they have taken, work experience hours done, etc.) who we will look at on an individual basis as an exception as well. Those who start to pursue CADC on and after the go live date will be required to obtain a BS degree.
 
As an ISAS, do I have to get my CADC?
No. The initial thought behind the ISAS was providing a means towards obtaining the CADC, and it is encouraged to do so, however, with these changes it isn't a requirement.
 
What if I am already working towards my CADC but won't have my application submitted by July 1, 2020?
Those pursuing their CADC prior to July 1st will need to show continuous enrollment in the process and pursuit towards the CADC certification. This can be shown by a) continued class specific studies within the CADC domains, or b) continuous work experience hours specific to the CADC domains.
 
I am currently a CADC and I do not have a bachelor's degree or higher level of education. Am I going to lose my CADC?
No, as long as your CADC remains current. If for any reason, your certification lapses, resulting in the need for reapplication for your CADC, the BS degree would then be a requirement. If you have received your BS degree or higher since your certification, please update us with this information and a copy of the degree.
 
Are there any changes to work experience hours?
No. A BS degree substitutes for 2000 hours of the 6000 hours work experience requirement. This hasn't changed. With a BS degree you will still be required to obtain 4000 work experience hours.
 
What BS degrees count for the CADC requirement?
The BS degree must be within the Behavioral Science Field. Some of these include but are not limited to: Sociology, Social Work, Psychology, Social Science, Counseling and Alcohol/Drug Studies. The board will continue to develop the acceptable degree list. If you have a BS degree which you think would qualify, please email us with your rationale and we can consider adding it to the list.
 
I have my ISAS now, but not my CADC. Will I be required to obtain a BS degree?
No. If you already have an ISAS but do not have a BS degree, you can still obtain a CADC. We recognize this is a change to your initial CADC plans and we want to support you on your CADC goal. In addition, there are some who may have begun their track towards CADC (evidenced by the classes they have taken, work experience hours done, etc.) who we will look at on an individual basis as an exception as well. Those who start to pursue CADC on and after the go live date will be required to obtain a BS degree.
 
As an ISAS, do I have to get my CADC?
No. The initial thought behind the ISAS was providing a means towards obtaining the CADC, and it is encouraged to do so, however, with these changes it isn't a requirement.


Frequently Asked Questions Concerning the Change from ISAS to SUDA

What will happen to the ISAS as a result of these changes?
With the changes, IBADCC also recognizes having the word “student” in the title of the ISAS certification isn't a very accurate description. As a result, IBADCC has decided to change the ISAS to SUDA. This acronym stands for Substance Use Disorder Associate. As of July 1, 2020, the transitioning to the SUDA title will begin to occur automatically. As ISAS renewals occur throughout the next 2 years, your new certification, at your time of renewal, will be SUDA rather than ISAS. Any new applications will also be for SUDA. We emphasize, there is no difference in scope of practice between the ISAS and the SUDA. Over time, this approach will phase out the ISAS title.
 
Does the ISAS qualify under the nationally recognized standards under IC&RC? Will SUDA be under IC&RC?
No. The ISAS and the SUDA is an Idaho certification and does not fall under the reciprocity through ICRC.
 
Do I have to do anything different when I go to renew my ISAS?
No. The transition to SUDA will be an automatic transition and will occur when you submit your renewal application. Rather than receiving a certificate with ISAS as the credential, it will have SUDA. In addition, new applications will be for the SUDA rather than the ISAS starting July 1, 2020.
 
Is there a limit to the number of times I can renew as a SUDA?
No. There is no limit to number of renewals. By going to the BS degree for the CADC and transitioning from the title ISAS to SUDA, supports having a SUDA as a permanent credential.
 
What about my supervision? Will I need to keep the same amount of supervision as I did under ISAS?
Yes. To reaffirm, the only change between ISAS to SUDA is the title itself. The supervision requirements remain the same.
 
Is there any change in the scope of practice?
No. The scope of practice for all certifications remains the same. The SUDA will have the same scope of practice as the ISAS.
 
Will the state reimburse for services done as a SUDA?
Good question. We have notified DHW, BPA Health and Optum regarding the change. We have been informed that adding the SUDA to the Idaho code will be an easy change and occur during the time legislation meets.
 
I still have some questions that were not covered. Who can I contact?
I'm glad you asked! If you have any other questions that may have been overlooked, please send those to our main email address ibadcc@ibadcc.org.
 

Questions?

If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC's Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, and on our Facebook page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.

Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members


May 21, 2020

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Mental Health Awareness Month

Dear IBADCC Members,

Did you know that May is Mental Health Awareness Month? How are you, your clients, and your loved ones coping during the pandemic? So much of our daily lives have been altered over the last few months, and even as the country begins to slowly open back up, we know the toll on mental health will continue to be profound. Two recent studies have found that more people are facing depression, stress, or other mental health challenges as a result of COVID-19. Closer to home, we know that our clients may turn to substances to cope with the new stressors we are all faced with. This week we are bringing you resources to help support your mental health, links to tools you can use with your clients, and a great article on how developing a work-life balance can help restore harmony in your life. But first, let's take a moment to acknowledge the achievements of our latest cohort of certification applicants!
 

Congratulations New and Renewing IBADCC Certificate Holders

The IBADCC is proud to share the names of the following individuals who have renewed their certifications and will be receiving their certificate in the mail this week!

The IBADCC recognizes the hard work and dedication it takes to work towards initial certification and keep certifications current. Thank you for your continued pursuit of excellence. It certainly is a benefit to our clients throughout Idaho!


Be Kind to Your Mind
As counselors, we are aware that the COVID-19 pandemic has had profound mental health impacts on our clients and their loved ones. In the midst of helping them manage their mental health, we must remember that we best serve our clients by taking care of ourselves first. We like this simple list of tips from the CDC to cope with stress during COVID-19:

     1   PAUSE. Breathe. Notice how you feel.
     2   TAKE BREAKS from COVID-19 content.
     3   MAKE TIME to sleep and exercise.
     4   REACH OUT and stay connected.
     5   SEEK HELP if overwhelmed or unsafe.

The American Counseling Association has an amazing list of self-care resources for counselors that you can access here.

Mental Health Month Toolkit

For over 70 years, Mental Health America has been spreading the word that mental health is something everyone should care about. While 1 in 5 people globally will experience a mental illness in their lifetime, the rates are much higher for those with substance use disorders. Roughly 37% of those with alcohol use disorders, and 53 percent of those with other drug use disorders, also have at least one serious mental illness. The work you are doing with clients right now is absolutely essential.
 
We were excited to see that Mental Health America recently published their Tools 2 Thrive Toolkit. You can download it here, or you can click on the links below for information on select topics that may be of interest to you, or for your work with clients:

We really love the timely perspective shared in their Finding Positive After Loss resource page. The pandemic has created pockets of loss throughout the fabric of society, and while it is natural to go through the grieving process, there are strategies to help us cope. Some of the tips for getting by include trying to see your experience as strength, learning from others, looking for opportunity amid adversity, finding ways to honor your loss, and not being afraid to get help. Get an expanded insight on these tips here. We also suggest checking out the recent message from the Assistant Secretary for Mental Health Awareness Month and National Prevention Week here
 

Work-Life Balance

Of adults employed full-time in the U.S., nearly 40% reported working at least 50 hours per week, and 18% work 60 hours or more. Unfortunately, health suffers when work takes over your life. Did you know that poor work-life balance increases your risk for health conditions like sleep problems, digestive disorders, and mental health problems? This is especially true for people who work longer shifts or on nights and weekends. Working overtime also increases the likelihood of having symptoms of depression, especially in men. When your work life and personal life are out of balance, your mental health is likely to be put in jeopardy. There are plenty of resources out there for navigating a healthy work-life balance. We think the Mayo Clinic published some fantastic tips on reclaiming control, including this segment on setting limits:

Manage your time. Cut or delegate activities you don't enjoy or can't handle — or share your concerns and possible solutions with your employer or others. Organize household tasks efficiently, such as running errands in batches or doing a load of laundry every day; don't save all the laundry for your day off. Do what needs to be done and let the rest go.

Make a list. Put family events on a weekly calendar, and keep a daily to-do list at home and at work. Having a plan helps you maintain focus. When you don't have a plan, it's easy to be sucked into the plans and priorities of others.

Learn to say no. Whether it's a co-worker asking you to spearhead an extra project or your child's teacher asking you to organize a class party, remember that it's OK to respectfully say no. When you quit accepting tasks out of guilt or a false sense of obligation, you'll have more time for activities that are meaningful to you.

Leave work at work. With the technology to connect to anyone at any time from virtually anywhere, there might be no boundary between work and home — unless you create it. Make a conscious decision to separate work time from personal time.

Reduce email access. Check emails no more than three times a day – late morning, early afternoon and late in the day. If you access email first thing in the morning, you tend to focus on and respond to other people's issues rather than being proactive about your own needs.

Take advantage of your options. Ask your employer about flex hours, a compressed workweek, job sharing, telecommuting or other scheduling flexibility. The more control you have over your hours, the less stressed you're likely to be.

Try to shorten commitments and minimize interruptions. Most people can sustain a maximum level of concentration for no more than 90 minutes. After that, the ability to retain information decreases dramatically. When interrupted during a task, you need double or triple the time of the interruption to regain full concentration on your task.

Read the full article here, including additional advice on caring for yourself and knowing when to seek emotional help.
 

Questions?

If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC's Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, and on our Facebook page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.

Sincerely,

IBADCC Board Members

May 14, 2020


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Study Guides & Exam Preparration

Dear IBADCC Members,

We hope this week's newsletter finds you healthy and engaged in your work! As the Education Committee gears up to review incoming certification applications, we know some of you may be gearing up to take your certification test! Many of you have asked us, what are the best resources for studying? Please read on for information on available study guides and exam preparation information. But first, let's take a moment to acknowledge and congratulate our newest certification recipients!
 

Congratulations Renewing IBADCC Certificate Holders

The IBADCC is proud to share the names of the following individuals who have renewed their certifications and will be receiving their certificate in the mail this week!
  • Marianne King renewed her Certified Prevention Specialist (CPS) certification.
  • Devin Pinckard renewed his Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) certification.
  • Linda Arrossa renewed her Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) certification.
  • Jennifer Ford renewed her Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) certification.
  • Reese Shelton renewed his Certified Peer Recovery Coach (CPRC) certification.
The IBADCC recognizes the hard work and dedication it takes to keep certifications current. Thank you for your continued pursuit of excellence. It certainly is a benefit to our clients throughout Idaho!
 

Study Guides and Exam Preparation

We have been receiving phone calls and emails from those of you who are ready to take your IBADCC certification exam. You are asking us, “what are the best study guides and resources?” While the IBADCC does not officially endorse a specific study guide, we do suggest you take a look at the following resources:

ReadyToTest  
ReadyToTest.com was founded in 2001 to assist counseling professionals who are working to obtain a credential as a drug and/or alcohol counselor. They are dedicated to providing not only quality training via distance learning, but a variety of resources to ensure that candidates for credentialing are prepared to the best of their abilities, allowing them to successfully complete their credentialing examinations. Check out their website to find out how ReadyToTest publications and materials can assist you. Some of their offerings include:

  • Written materials to help you review and prepare for your basic drug and alcohol credentialing examinations including a 781-page content review manual for drug/alcohol credentialing, "how-to" guides for both the written and oral exams, including sample written exams and sample oral responses, and online sample exams with immediate scoring and review
  • Written materials to help you review and/or prepare for your advanced drug/alcohol credentials including a content review manual for the written clinical supervisor exam and a sample written exam
  • Information on how to set up onsite review coursework for your staff at your own facility
  • Resources for developing live training programs for delivery in your city, state, and region
  • Online training, testing/evaluation using online and hard copy sample exams
Learn more by visiting ReadyToTest.com.
 
IC&RC Resources
The IC&RC endorses study guides for their programs, and while they do not participate in the development or publications of these guides, they do feel the information in each guide is that which candidates should know to prepare for their examination. Links to the available study guides include:

The IC&RC has also developed candidate guides, providing guidance for the IC&RC examination process. Candidate Guides provide background information on the examination development and administration process. They also contain exam content guidelines, sample questions, and examination reference lists. To learn more about the available candidate guides, practice exams, or additional free resources, visit this page on the IC&RC website.


Questions?

If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC's Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including our COVID-19 page, and on our Facebook page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.
 
Sincerely,
 
IBADCC Board Members

May 7, 2020


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Prometric Testing Site Announcement

Dear IBADCC Members,
 
This week we are keeping it short and sweet! We know many of you are anxious to hear the status of testing sites and schedules for reopening. The IBADCC recently received an update from IC&RC. Please read on for this important announcement, along with links to past newsletters that may be of interest to you. 

 

Prometric Testing Site Announcement

As you may have heard, Prometric resumed testing effective May 1st for all partners deemed essential as indicated by the CDC guidelines. To guarantee everything was ready for the resumption of testing, they had to ensure they understood and documented all government mandates and social distancing requirements. This has proven to be extremely difficult, because they are dependent upon the information being released at all levels of government (federal, state, county, and city), and this information is changing daily, if not more frequently. They also had to ensure the sites were prepared to follow all PPE and social distancing requirements, or they would not be able to open. There was a lot to do in a very short period of time, but they were committed to making it happen, because they want candidates to be able to schedule and take their exams. 

If you were not aware, IC&RC was deemed as essential and, as a result, testing for candidates resumed May 1.  While this is exciting news, it has presented a number of challenges, and a few IC&RC candidates were adversely affected by these challenges. Over the weekend a few IC&RC candidates did show up to test at centers that had to close. The sites were required to close with little to no notice, and they were not able to update their site schedules. A notice was sent to all candidates affected by the closures, but they may not have received the email notification in time, or the notification may have been directed to their spam folders. Additionally, the candidates were still showing as being scheduled in the scheduling platform. This added to the confusion and candidates continuing to the sites on the day of their exams. 
To ensure this is not an issue moving forward, they are reaching out to each candidate prior to their scheduled exam session and confirming the sites status. If a site happens to be closed, they are rescheduling the candidates to another facility.  There are currently 324 IC&RC candidates scheduled for an exam through the end of June and this is the schedule through Sunday:
  • Thursday 8 candidates
  • Friday 13 candidates
  • Saturday 31 candidates
  • Sunday 0 candidates
They expect additional sites to add seats to their calendars in the coming days once the local governments ease the lockdown restrictions and the sites are able to meet the CDC social distancing guidelines. They will provide an update a couple times a week. As more information becomes available, we will send out additional communications.


 

Acccess Previous Issue of IBADCC Newsletters

Over the last five weeks, IBADCC has published helpful tips and supportive resources to help you navigate some of the pressing issues presented by COVID-19. Click on the links below to read past issues that highlight the following topics:

 

Questions?

If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC's Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including the new COVID-19 page, and on our Facebook page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.
 
Sincerely,
 
IBADCC Board Members

May 5, 2020

Please find below a note from Prometric regarding testing

Good day IC&RC family,

I hope you, your teams, and your families are all safe and well. As you may or may not be aware, Prometric resumed testing effective May 1st for all partners deemed essential as indicated by the CDC guidelines. To guarantee everything was ready for the resumption of testing, we had to ensure we understood and documented all government mandates and social distancing requirements. This has proven to be extremely difficult, because we are dependent upon the information being released at all levels of government (federal, state, county, and city), and this information is changing daily, if not more frequently. We also had to ensure the sites were prepared to follow all PPE and social distancing requirements, or they would not be able to open. There was a lot to do in a very short period of time, but we were committed to making happen, because we want candidates to be able to schedule and take their exams.

If you were not aware, IC&RC was deemed as essential and, as a result, testing for your candidates resumed May 1. While this is exciting news, it has presented a number of challenges, and a few IC&RC candidates were adversely affected by these challenges this weekend. Over the weekend a few IC&RC candidates did show up to test at centers that had to close. The sites were required to close with little to no notice, and they were not able to update their site schedules. A notice was sent to all candidates affected by the closures, but they may not have received the email notification in time, or the notification may have been directed to their spam folders. Additionally, the candidates were still showing as being scheduled in the scheduling platform. This added to the confusion and candidates continuing to the sites on the day of their exams.

To ensure this is not an issue moving forward, we are reaching out to each candidate prior to their scheduled exam session and confirming the sites status. If a site happens to be closed, we are rescheduling the candidates to another facility. There are currently 324 IC&RC candidates scheduled for an exam through the end of June and this is the schedule for the next 6 days:

Monday – 10 candidate
Tuesday – 7 candidates
Wednesday – 1 candidates
Thursday – 8 candidates
Friday – 13 candidates
Saturday – 31 candidates
Sunday – 0 candidates

We expect additional sites to add seats to their calendars in the coming days once the local governments ease the lockdown restrictions and the sites are able to meet the CDC social distancing guidelines. We will provide an update a couple times a week, so you can monitor what effect this Pandemic is having on your candidates. I know this is an unprecedented event, and I want to assure you that your program and candidates are a top priority. If you have any questions, or need any information, please do not hesitate to reach out. 

Prometric SMT


April 30, 2020


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Addressing your FAQ's and Concerns & Upcoming Webinars

Dear IBADCC Members,
 
We asked, and you responded! Thank you so much for taking the time to submit your thoughts and questions over the last week. In this week's newsletter we will highlight frequently asked questions on issues impacting you now, including certification changes, testing site updates, client concerns, and timely resources. Also included at the end of this newsletter is a selection of upcoming live webinars that may be of interest to you.  

 

Frequently Asked Questions and Concerns


"When will testing resume?"
The IBADCC recently received an update from IC&RC. Prometric is scheduled to resume testing for essential services and programs in U.S. and Canada test centers effective May 1st, where they are able to do so. Please click here for the most up-to-date list of markets where they are looking to resume testing, based on governmental clearance and other market factors. This is subject to change daily. All candidates who will not be able to test as a result of social distancing policies through May and June are being notified this week via email. Where applicable, candidates will have their appointments rescheduled or canceled, based on program requirements. Essential candidates who will be testing in May will receive an email reminder with social distancing guidelines and procedures three days prior to test day; and then a follow-up phone call one day prior. Please click here for a copy of this communication. As more information becomes available, we will send out additional communications.
 
"I have been unable to obtain my CEUs because of in-person event cancellations. Do online education courses or recorded webinars count? What training resources does IBADCC produce?"
Live training opportunities have been canceled across the world, and we know the cancellation of the IBADCC conference has impacted many. The current requirement of obtaining 50% of your continuing education hours via in-person trainings has been temporarily waived due to the impact of COVID-19. You now have the option to obtain all education through online programs. Visit the IBADCC website for a list of continuing education providers that are accepted by IBADCC. Currently, IBADCC does not produce education or training courses. We appreciate your feedback on this need, and will continue to review potential new resources for our members.
 
"Have certification deadlines been extended due to COVID-19 impacts?"
Yes! All individuals who are in the process of renewing their certification will now be granted a certification grace period of six months from their renewal expiration date.
 
"How long does it take to process certification applications, and can this process be sped up to help people get to work faster?"
The application review process typically takes 4-6 weeks from the point of submission to final approval. If the IBADCC Education Committee deems an application incomplete, this time frame will be longer. We understand the urgency and have been reviewing ways to help improve our process. The IBADCC is excited to announce it is currently working through a transition that will allow applications to be submitted and reviewed online. We believe this will expedite the process, and expect to have this system ready by mid-late summer. Stay tuned!
 
"Are substance use disorder treatment groups occurring through video conferencing apps? If so, is there training available for facilitators?"
While many counselors are now offering individual treatment via TeleHealth, the occurrence of SUD providers offering treatment to groups via video conferencing is varied, and factors may include access to video conference platforms and policies around privacy and confidentiality. Treatment providers and peer support specialists looking for online and telephone support groups for their patients/peers can review the following lists for virtual recovery resources, including the Mountain Plains ATTC list of online support groups, and  SAMHSA's virtual recovery programs, which includes tips to set up a virtual recovery meeting. We are not aware of in-depth training programs for facilitators.
 
"Are there options for those waiting to take the test to complete it online or with their clinical supervisor serving as a proctor?"
Currently, the option to complete your certification test online or with a local proctor is not allowed.
 
"How long can we continue using TeleHealth with our clients, and what resources are available to help us with this method?"
It has been impressive to see counselors taking on the challenge of keeping contact with clients through the use of TeleHealth resources. Some have found this medium very effective, while others has proven to be a steep learning curve. It is anticipated this change will result in additional ways for us to work with individuals and offer them further options to connect and obtain the services they desire. To sustain the use of TeleHealth in your practice, please utilize secure, confidential platforms that support and fit within the established HIPPA and 42 CFR guidelines. This will help ensure TeleHealth remains sustainable during and after the COVID-19 crisis. The April 9th edition of IBADCC's weekly newsletter focused on TeleHealth tips and resources. You can read the newsletter in full here to get information on effective remote counseling, the Idaho Medicaid provider guidelines around TeleHealth, policy updates on key TeleHealth provisions, and TeleHealth training opportunities.
 
"What telehealth programs do you recommend that are suitable for our clients?"
The IBADCC does not recommend or endorse specific TeleHealth programs. We do encourage you to use appropriate technological platforms where security standards conform with the recommendations of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (DHHS). For a practitioner to be HIPAA compliant, it is important to choose a vendor that will issue a  Business Associate Agreement (BAA), which outlines the responsibilities to maintain protected health information (PHI). Select a vendor that allows you to continue to practice ethically and in compliance with HIPAA, HITECH, and state confidentiality laws and regulations.
 
"Can we be instrumental in reducing abuse, even with social distancing?"
Absolutely! Right now your clients need you more than ever. COVID-19 is the perfect storm in the addiction world. Necessary coronavirus containment measures, like physical distancing and closures of public spaces, are making it harder for people with substance use disorders to seek help, keep up their treatment regimen, or access social supports. It's also important to remember that, amid all of this, individuals with addiction could face greater risks related to COVID-19, particularly those who smoke tobacco or marijuana, vape, or use opioids or methamphetamines, because of the negative effects these substances have on respiratory and pulmonary systems. The National Institute on Drug Abuse published an excellent article on the Potential Implications for Individuals with Substance Use Disorders. Because of these challenges, staying connected to support and services during the pandemic is critical for the millions of people who are struggling with mental health issues and substance abuse addiction and recovery.
 
"I have concerns regarding Medicaid expansion and my ACADC not being recognized by Optum to work with clinical clients. This puts a gap in SUD services and regression in SUD stability because I am not able to continue to work with established clients. Is the Board collaborating with Optum to help develop acceptance and competency of ACADC counselors with Optum?"
The IBADCC Executive team is working diligently with Optum and our Medicaid partners to advocate on behalf of our members, their certification status, and associated requirements. We anticipate that Medicaid will release a statement on this issue soon, and we will certainly keep you informed when it is published. If you have questions, we encourage you to reach out to our contacts at Medicaid: Charles Beal and Clay Lord. You can also reach out to your IBADCC regional representative to provide feedback on how these new requirements will impact your day-to-day business. You can find their contact information at the bottom of this newsletter.
 
"Self-care seems to be a strong need right now. What resources are available?"
We could not agree more. Self-care helps you respond to and prevent burnout. It also enables you to carry out your professional responsibility, which is to do well for your clients. Modeling good self-care is good for you and everyone else, including clients. Last week our newsletter focused on tips and resources for taking care of your emotional health. Click here to read more in the April 23rd edition. It's also important for your clients to understand how to practice self care. We like this article on 5 Ways to Practice Self Care in Addition Recovery. It will give you some great ideas on how to help guide your clients in their own self care journey.
 

Upcoming Webinars

Here are just a few upcoming webinars that might be of interest to you as you navigate client care amidst COVID-19. These focus on Opiod Use Disorders and are published by the Providers Clinical Support System, a program funded by SAMHSA.

Questions?

If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCC's Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including the new COVID-19 page, and on our Facebook page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.
 
Thank you for your tireless support of our clients in treatment. While you provide them with recovery resources and support, we are here to provide you with the resources and support you need to be successful.

Sincerely,
 
IBADCC Board Members



April 23, 2020

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IC&RC Testing Updates and
Tips for Taking Care of Yourself

Dear IBADCC Members,
 
This week we ask, how are you doing? We are interested in your thoughts, questions, and concerns. We are taking time this week to collect feedback from our members to help better guide the resources and support we provide. Please take a minute to fill out this survey, or send your comments to ibadcc@ibadcc.org. We will feature answers to your most commonly asked questions in our April 30th newsletter.
 
This week, in our effort to provide you with ongoing resources related to COVID-19 and your work, we are providing an update on IC&RC testing, and focusing on tips for managing your stress during these uncertain times, including links to important helplines. Read on to learn more about how you can take care of yourself in order to ensure you have the energy and focus to care for your clients.
 

IC&RC Testing Update

We know many of you have been anxious to hear about the re-opening of testing sites. We are excited to share that we recently received a notice from IC&RC on the plans Prometric has to resume in-center testing operations in some U.S. and Canadian locations where they are able to do so in compliance with governmental directives or regulations, effective May 1st. You can read the full statement here, and in the meantime, see below for some additional information for testers:
  • Prometric will inform impacted candidates early next week of the need to cancel their existing appointment as the result of implementing social distancing preventative measures.
  • The date range of the appointments that will be impacted runs from May 1st through June 30th.
  • After the candidate notification has been sent, we will begin processing the cancellations and reschedules (program depending) in the scheduling system. Cancellations and reschedules will be prioritized by appointment date.
  • For test takers scheduling new appointments for dates from July 1st onward, the available capacity will appear to be the same 50% that's imposed during the social distancing period. Out of an abundance of caution, we will hold off on displacing these candidates for now, but we will continue to monitor the situation.
  • Every 30 days, Prometric leadership will review current conditions and will determine if an extension of the social distancing measures are necessary. If that decision is made, we will inform candidates of their cancelled appointments.
  • For test takers who will be testing during this time, Prometric will reconfirm their appointment and send clients and candidates a list of social distancing and safety guidelines that candidates will have to follow while in the test center.

For more information, and further details on this statement, visit the IBADCC website.
 

Taking Care of Your Emotional Health

It is natural to feel stress, anxiety, grief, and worry during and after a disaster. Everyone reacts differently, and your own feelings will change over time. Notice and accept how you feel. Taking care of your emotional health during an emergency will help you think clearly and react to the urgent needs to protect yourself, your family, and your clients. Self-care during an emergency will help your long-term healing. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends taking the following steps to cope with a disaster:

  • Take care of your body. Try to eat healthy well-balanced meals, exercise regularly, and get plenty of sleep. With your new, unstructured time, find ways to create a routine to make sure you have consistency in your days.
  • Connect with others. Share your concerns and how you are feeling with a friend or family member. Maintain healthy relationships, and build a strong support system. We love this article on using technology to stay connected.
  • Take breaks. Make time to unwind and remind yourself that strong feelings will fade. Try taking in deep breaths. Try to do activities you usually enjoy.
  • Stay informed. When you feel that you are missing information, you may become more stressed or nervous. Watch, listen to, or read the news for updates from officials. Be aware that there may be rumors during a crisis, especially on social media. Always check your sources and turn to reliable sources of information like your local government authorities.
  • Avoid too much exposure to news. Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories. It can be upsetting to hear about the crisis and see images repeatedly. Try to do enjoyable activities and return to normal life as much as possible and check for updates between breaks.
  • Look out for these common signs of distress, and seek professional help if you experience these feelings or behaviors for several days in a row and are unable to carry out normal responsibilities because of them:               
    • Feelings of numbness, disbelief, anxiety or fear
    • Changes in appetite, energy, and activity levels
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Difficulty sleeping or nightmares and upsetting thoughts and images
    • Physical reactions, such as headaches, body pains, stomach problems, and skin rashes
    • Worsening of chronic health problems
    • Anger or short-temper

 As a counselor, you may be acutely aware of changes in your clients’ behavior. During this time, we would encourage you to stay in-tune with your own feelings and behavior. For more guidance, you can read the American Counseling Association’s article on Handling the Stress of the Current Health Crisis.


Helplines

You are not alone in feeling fear, anxiety, frustration, and helplessness over the new normal caused by COVID-19. It is important to listen to yourself and reach out when you need assistance or advice. The best counselors often ask for help. Here are some helplines that may be of use to you, your clients, or your loved ones:
  • SAMHSAs Disaster Distress Helpline: A 24/7, 365 day a year counseling and support phone-line for people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters. (1-800-985-5990)
  • Idaho COVID-19 Hotline: For questions on issues related to COVID-19 in Idaho, this hotline is open Monday through Friday, 8am to 6pm. (1-888-330-3010)
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: For coping tools and resources, the Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals.


Questions?

If you have questions on the recommendations or resources included in this email, or if you have specific questions not addressed here, please contact IBADCCs Executive Director, Becca Stickney, at bstickney@ibadcc.org. The IBADCC will also be posting updates for members on our website, including a new COVID-19 page, and on our Facebook page where you can follow us to receive timely updates.
 
Thank you for your tireless support of our clients in treatment. While you provide them with recovery resources and support, we are here to provide you with the resources and support you need to be successful.

Sincerely,
 
IBADCC Board Members


April 16, 2020

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IBADCC COVID-19 Update:

Guidance for Residential Programs